Sori Yanagi Magma Plate Iron Frying Pan – 18cm

USD$72.89

 

W22 x L24 x H4cm

Magma Plate iron / Stainless Steel lid / Bakelite handle

Made In Japan

 

Out of stock

SKU: KTSYG36530 Categories: , Tags: , , ,

This iron frying pan features a lightweight material with a smooth design that makes cooking easier and neater.

Since it is NOT coated with fluorine, it has the durability unique to iron frying pans. Heat conduction is also better than with ordinary iron pans, allowing food to retain more flavour with a faster cooking time. 

 

The spouts on either side allow for easy transfer of food to serving dishes and containers, while also functioning let out steam and drain excess liquid with just a slight rotation of the stainless-steel lid.  

 

“Magma Plate” is a highly durable and unique material developed in Japan and now used in Sori Yanagi’s line of iron frying pans. The tempered material is carved with concave and convex patterns inside and out similar to cast iron, this construction helps to promote healthy interaction with cooking oil.  The more you use it, it prevents food from burning or sticking to the pan and the less likely it is to rust.

Tolerant to high heat and compatible with both IH and gas stove tops, this high quality pan will help you in the kitchen for many years to come.

Care & Usage:

1. Each time you use this pan, preheat the pan on low heat and apply oil to the cooking surface before adding food. *Especially for the first few times of use, make sure to apply sufficient amounts of oil.

 

2. After cooking, hand wash the pan with hot water using a sponge. Do not use soap or harsh detergents.

 

3. Hand dry the pan thoroughly 

 

4. Apply a small amount of vegetable oil inside and outside to season while the pan is still warm.

 

5. Store in a dry location.

 

*In order to avoid the formation of rust, food should not be left in a pan after cooking

*Recommended for cooking on low to medium heat.

 

SORI YANAGI

Since 1950, Japan

* * * 

Sōri Yanagi (柳 宗理, 1915–2011) was a Japanese industrial designer renowned for his beautifully simple homewares and furniture. Sori Yanagi’s organic forms combine simplicity and practicality with elements of Japan’s native artisanal traditions. This successful synthesis made Yanagi one of the most significant Japanese designers of the post-war era. 

 

Born in 1915 as a son of Soetsu Yanagi, who founded the “Mingei” movement which celebrated Japanese folk crafts and the beauty of everyday objects. Soetsu helped establish the Nihon Mingeikan, the Folk Crafts Museum of Japan. Sori entered Tokyo Art School in 1934, where he studied both art and architecture. He was influenced by Le Corbusier as well as by Charlotte Perriand when she worked in Japan in the early 1940s. After graduating from the Academy of Fine Arts in Japan (currently Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music), he studied at Junzo Sakakura’s Architectural office. Having the background of both art and architecture in school, he pioneered Japanese postwar industrial design. In 1950, he founded Yanagi Design Institute,which created a prolific number of articles of daily use and furnishings. 

 

Having the background of studying both art and architecture in school, he pioneered Japanese postwar industrial design. In 1950, he founded Yanagi Design Institute. He designed many products: furniture, three-wheeled vehicles, Olympic cauldrons, pedestrian overpasses, etc. In 1951, his cabinet for home appliances won First Prize at the first Japan Industrial Design Contest. In 1957, Butterfly Stool won the Gold Medal at Triennale in Milan, Italy. From 1977 he served as president of the Japan Folk Craft Museum. He also designed the torch holder and the seats in the stadium for the Tokyo Olympic Games in 1964. The water kettle was just one of Sori Yanagi’s most famous designs as well as his porcelain and silverware series. 

 

He was consistent with customer’s point of view, and considered design with making model by himself. He designed many works which enriched daily life and could be used long term. The designer’s focus was always the unconscious beauty of everyday objects. His philosophy and passion towards design in his work have been appreciated around the world.

“Whether handcrafted or manufactured, a design is born from its connection to everyday life. And this is also the source of true beauty.”

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